Mish Shedlock Blog | Escape Illinois: Get The Hell Out Now, We Are | Talkmarkets
Investment Advisor Representative - Sitka Pacific Capital Management

Mike "Mish" Shedlock is a registered investment advisor representative for SitkaPacific Capital Management. Sitka Pacific is an asset management firm whose goal is strong performance and low volatility, regardless of market ... more

Escape Illinois: Get The Hell Out Now, We Are

Date: Sunday, October 6, 2019 11:14 PM EDT

Illinois is second to Alaska in net outbound migration. Many move out, but few move in.

Behind the Chatter

Please consider the Chicago Tribune article on the ‘Illinois Exodus.’

An “Escaping Illinois” Facebook group has more than 39,000 followers. One man even wrote a song called “Goodbye Illinois,” lamenting the state’s taxes and political corruption and expressing his desire to leave.

The state has been struggling to keep residents for decades, with more people leaving than arriving since at least 1970. But it’s only in the last few years that the state’s population and that of its largest and most important economic engine, Chicago, have slipped.

Outward Bound

In 2018, the state had an estimated net migration loss of 6.5 people for every 1,000 residents, according to the most recent census data. Five years earlier, the net loss was about 3 people per 1,000 residents.

The latest number puts Illinois 49th out of the nation’s 50 states on net migration loss. Only Alaska had a worse rate, with a loss of 11 people per 1,000 residents.

Population decline is also happening in more parts of the state. From 1990 to 2000, 68 of Illinois’ 102 counties gained population. But so far this decade, only nine counties, including Kane, Will and DuPage in the Chicago area, have added residents.

Goodbye Illinois

“Well, they’re taxing this and they’re taxing that, pretty soon there ain’t nothin’ left," Raudys sings as he strums a guitar. “Pension fund is so well run, worst in the nation: well done! I’d really like to stay, but I just can’t pay and pay.”

Absurd Census Questions

The Census Bureau conducts a survey every month that includes questions about why a person changed residences in the previous year. The survey offers a range of possible answers, from foreclosure/eviction to change of climate to “wanted better neighborhood/less crime.”

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