E Embryos Of Globanomics And Some Of Its Principals

There are fundamentally two reasons that I get to publish through Talkmarkets: (1) for my analytics; and (2) for my globanomics. The analytics comes and goes while the globanomics is always there. Anyway, I took a short break from globanomics feeling somewhat disappointed that just like that—with a flip of a switch—globanomics was not in fact the way we were operating today. That is just not the case. It is going to take some time. I am just hoping to see it in my lifetime, and I am 74.

I have been reading Obama’s book, A Promised Land these past few weeks and it is a great book, filled with all kinds of details about how governance actually works. Obama and I are pretty much lockstep together in our view of the future. I might disagree with him on a couple of his historical conclusions, but any differences there are minor in terms of globanomics. 

glass walled high rise building

Image Source: Unsplash

Anyway, something Obama wrote really stuck home with me and I would like to share his words with you now. 

He wrote:

The Presidency changes your time horizons. Rarely do your efforts bear fruit right away, the scale of problems coming across your desk is too big for that, the factors at play too varied.  You learn to measure progress in steps—each of which may take months to accomplish, none of which merit much public notice—and to reconcile yourself to the knowledge that your ultimate goal, if ever achieved, may take a year or two or even a full term to realize.

Now with that said, I would like to share with you now the “embryos of globanomics” as explained to a smaller group of followers that follow me on my personal blog site, which lies both inside and outside of Talkmarkets as I understand it.  Along with other things, the following explains the embryos of many of the principles that have been built into globanomics.

The real, deep down, real embryos for globanomics came to life sometime during the four-year period (1969-1973) when I served as a junior U.S. naval officer on the fleet ballistic missile submarine, called the USS Nathanael Greene (SSBN 636) during the heart of the Cold War. During that time, I served as a nuclear-trained officer, who became qualified in submarines—meaning at one time or another I also served as the Officer of the Deck (OOD) in charge of the entire ship’s operations.

1 2 3 4
View single page >> |

Disclosure: No positions.

How did you like this article? Let us know so we can better customize your reading experience.

Comments

Leave a comment to automatically be entered into our contest to win a free Echo Show.
William K. 2 weeks ago Member's comment

Quite an interesting and educational article, and certainly not of the kind typical to this excellent ongoing collection. But very well said. Without any lamenting as to how the rich are not getting richer nearly a fast as they would want to.

Really, this article is quite a bit to think about. Thanks for presenting it.

Jim Boswell 1 week ago Author's comment

Thank you for your kind comments--they are greatly appreciated. Based upon what you said, i thought you might find the following link to something I wrote Wednesday, but TalkMarkets did not publish, saying that i had only a "niche" audience for the material. Just the same, here is the link to the article that is out on my TalkMarkets "blog" site. Personally, i was surprised TalkMarkets did not publish it. It's called the Curriculum for a Globanomacist.

talkmarkets.com/.../curriculum-for-a-globanonacist

Katy Lin 1 week ago Member's comment

You do seem to be a niche author. But there's nothing wrong with that.

William K. 1 week ago Member's comment

J.B. You do have a "niche" audience that unfortunately does not include all of those addicted to increasing their wealth constantly. That is, those seriously infected by greed. Others will find, at least this article, the writings to be at least thought provoking.

The whole concept of micro-economics is interesting. If I understand it to be my personal economics, my practice is to always need less than I have, and to thus not constantly desire to have more. So when that "more" somehow arrives I can consider it a gift and be thankful, instead of complaining that it is not enough.

This then divides folks into two major realms, the rich, who have more than they need, and the poor, who have less than they need. (Of course, there is a wide spread in each realm.) There is also a small middle class, who seem to feel that they have just what they need.

Jim Boswell 1 week ago Author's comment

My wife and i live on a $45,000 a year budget which is made up of social security and the retirement investment savings we have. We can make it the age of 100 before our investments run out, assuming no annual return. When i complained to TalkMarkets that they were not paying us for the articles we write, i received all kinds of backlash. More bad comments than ever before. Some even said they felt little of my pain for being poor in their eyes because of my M.B.A. and M.P.A. degrees. F--- them i said in response.

I do not apologize for my questioning of TalkMarkets because my wife and i are part of the middle class that you mentioned that feel we have enough to live nicely. Of course, we own our own house, so we don't pay a mortgage, and because i make no money we pay no taxes, no kids to any longer support, so our $45,000 gets us along fine.

I do believe Biden is working to fix some of the equity problems, so i keep pushing globanomics, hoping Obama will pick up the torch as part of his retirement.

William K. 1 week ago Member's comment

At one point I was getting paid for the things that I wrote. Not sure just what happened but eventually it stopped.

The best compensation for writing was when I was creating sales letters for proposals for custom industrial machines. The challenge was always to describe what the machine would do fora customer and some of how it would do that, without including enough information so that competitors could copy our concepts. That was a problem with one client, because a "Mister Lopez" would combine the cheapest bid with the best concepts and demand a revised price quote. A rather disreputable way of doing business, actually.

I don't think that he works for that company any more.

Terrence Howard 2 weeks ago Member's comment

Interesting, thanks.

Jim Boswell 1 week ago Author's comment

Thank you for your kind comments--they are greatly appreciated. Based upon your interest, i thought you might find the following link to something I wrote Wednesday, but TalkMarkets did not publish, saying that i had only a "niche" audience for the material. Just the same, here is the link to the article that is out on my TalkMarkets "blog" site. Personally, i was surprised TalkMarkets did not publish it. It's called the Curriculum for a Globanomacist.

Thank you for your kind comments--they are greatly appreciated. Based upon what you said, i thought you might find the following link to something I wrote Wednesday, but TalkMarkets did not publish, saying that i had only a "niche" audience for the material. Just the same, here is the link to the article that is out on my TalkMarkets "blog" site. Personally, i was surprised TalkMarkets did not publish it. It's called the Curriculum for a Globanomacist.

talkmarkets.com/.../curriculum-for-a-globanonacist

Terrence Howard 1 week ago Member's comment

Nice that you mentioned me in your article. But you are wrong - I am following you.

Jim Boswell 1 week ago Author's comment

I have about 1100 followers altogether. Approximately 80% of those followers are following exactly 85 and 35 people--no more, no less. I noticed that you were following 528 people so i do not believe that you fall in the same category as most of my TalkMarket followers.