Wall Street Is Chasing Ghosts

Wall Street’s absolute obsession with the soon to be announced most wonderful trade deal with China is mind-boggling. The cheerleaders that haunt mainstream financial media don’t even care what kind of deal gets done. They don’t care if it hurts the already faltering condition of China’s economy or even if it does little to improve the chronically massive US trade deficits—just as long as both sides can spin it as a victory and return to the status quo all will be fine.

But let’s look at some facts that contradict this assumption. The problems with China are structural and have very little if anything to do with a trade war. To prove this let’s first look at the main stock market in China called the Shanghai Composite Index. This index peaked at over 5,100 in the summer of 2015. It began last year at 3,550. But today is trading at just 2,720. From its peak in 2015 to the day the trade war began on July 6th of 2018, the index fell by 47%. Therefore, it is silly to blame China’s issues on trade alone. The real issue with China is debt. In 2007 its debt was $7 trillion, and it has skyrocketed to $40 trillion today. It is the most unbalanced and unproductive pile of debt dung the world has ever seen, and it was built in record time by an edict from the communist state.

Next, while it is true that in the long run, tariffs are bad for growth – and history proves this beyond a doubt -- in the short term, this trade war between the US and China has actually helped boost global trade and GDP. A prolonged period of tariffs is bad for global growth because it stunts global trade—that is what’s bad about a trade war. But that is not what happened in this case; trade has actually increased. This is probably because president Trump first put on a relatively small level of tariffs in July of last year and then threatened to significantly increase the import duties at the start of 2019. This caused a surge in trade from both countries in an attempt to front run the deadline. Hence, China actually had a record trade surplus with the US in 2018 of $323.3 billion. US imports from China surged by 11.3% year over year to $478.4 billion. And, exports from the US to China actually increased as well—however, by a much smaller 0.7%. This trend continued in January, as China's January dollar-denominated exports rose 9.1% from the year-ago period—most likely due to Trump’s can kick with raising tariffs until March 1st.

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Michael Pento is the President and Founder of Pento Portfolio Strategies, produces the weekly podcast called, more

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