Other Enjoyments, Of A Purer, More Lasting, And More Exquisite Nature

A defense of Weber’s Protestant Ethic thesis from the 1940s by Ephraim Fischoff makes the plausible argument that critics — and many supporters — of Weber’s essay attached unwarranted causality to it, as if “Calvinism caused capitalism.” Instead, Fischoff explained:

Weber’s thesis must be construed not according to the usual interpretation, as an effort to trace the causative influence of the Protestant ethic upon the emergence of capitalism, but as an exposition of the rich congruency of such diverse aspects of a culture as religion and economics.

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Fair enough. Then along comes Colin Campbell 43 some odd years later talking about the Other Protestant Ethic. It was Campbell’s intention in The Romantic Ethic and the Spirit of Consumerism to update Weber and to fill in what he saw as a significant gap in Weber’s thesis — his failure to account for new consumer attitudes, which Campbell traced back to Sentimentalism and Romanticism, both adaptations of Protestantism. 

If my brief summary doesn’t do justice to Campbell’s analysis, it is only because his evocative chapter title, “The Other Protestant Ethic” at once evokes and forecloses the possibility of two, three, many Protestant Ethics. Campbell is conspicuously silent on the labor movement, whose conservative motto, “a fair day’s wage for a fair day’s work,” expressed both a work ethic and a consumer ethic. Nor does Campbell mention the radical, socialist and anarchist cults, sects and movements who proudly wore their Protestantism on their sleeves.

Those two omissions are all the more glaring in that the Romanticism Campbell does feature was deeply implicated in both of them. Campbell spends several pages in an analysis of William Wordsworth’s preface to the 1802 second edition of his Lyrical Ballads, in which Wordsworth inserted an “Easter egg” of biblical proportions that serves as the title of this post. Wordsworth’s “enjoyments… of a more exquisite nature” is almost certainly an appropriation of or allusion to William Godwin’s argument about commodities, labor, and leisure from his essay, “Of Avarice and Profusion” in The Enquirer:

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