Biden's Plan: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

We have details of Biden's Plan. Let's take a look at 16 items.

Here's Biden's Plan

  1. $1.9 Trillion Total
  2.  Stimulus checks of $1,400 per person in addition to the $600 checks Congress approved in December. 
  3. Moratorium on evictions and foreclosures would be extended through September.
  4. The federal minimum wage would be raised to $15 per hour from the current rate of $7.25 per hour.
  5. Guaranteed paid sick leave.
  6.  A $20 billion national program would establish community vaccination centers across the U.S. and send mobile units to remote communities. Medicaid patients would have their costs covered by the federal government, and the administration says it will take steps to ensure all people in the U.S. can receive the vaccine for free, regardless of their immigration status.
  7.  An additional $50 billion would expand testing efforts and help schools and governments implement routine testing. Other efforts would focus on developing better treatments for COVID-19 and improving efforts to identify and track new strains of the virus.
  8. The child care tax credit would be expanded for a year, to cover half the cost of child care up to $4,000 for one child and $8,000 for two or more for families making less than $125,000 a year. Families making between $125,000 and $400,000 would get a partial credit.
  9.  $15 billion in federal grants to help states subsidize child care for low-income families, along with a $25 billion fund to help child care centers in danger of closing.
  10. $130 billion for K-12 schools to help them reopen safely. The money is meant to help reach Biden’s goal of having a majority of the nation’s K-8 schools open within his first 100 days in the White House. Schools could use the funding to cover a variety of costs, including the purchase of masks and other protective equipment, upgrades to ventilation systems and staffing for school nurses. 
  11. Public colleges and universities would get $35 billion to cover pandemic-related expenses and to steer funding to students as emergency grants. An additional $5 billion would go to governors to support programs helping students who were hit hardest by the pandemic.
  12. $15 billion in grants to more than 1 million small businesses that have been hit hard by the pandemic, as well as other assistance.
  13. $350 billion in emergency funding for state, local and territorial governments to help front-line workers.
  14.  $20 billion in aid to public transit agencies.
  15.  $9 billion to modernize information technology systems at federal agencies, motivated by recent cybersecurity attacks that penetrated multiple agencies.
  16. $690 million to boost federal cybersecurity monitoring efforts and $200 million to hire hundreds of new cybersecurity experts.
1 2 3 4
View single page >> |
How did you like this article? Let us know so we can better customize your reading experience.

Comments

Leave a comment to automatically be entered into our contest to win a free Echo Show.