Precious Metals: The Foundation Of A Sound Financial Portfolio

Precious metals are the bedrock of the financial world. They have permanent value and are the oldest form of money in the world. If you don’t own physical gold and silver, your investment portfolio lacks a sound foundation. Precious metals are often sought after as a store of permanent value, and as a method of diversifying portfolios.

While cash, bonds, stocks, and real estate offer investors financial diversification, precious metals underpin all other assets, particularly during times of economic turbulence and market turmoil.

Imagine an upside-down pyramid containing successive layers of asset classes.

Precious Metals: The Foundation of a Sound Financial Portfolio | Nick Barisheff

Exeter’s Pyramid

That’s what the late John Exter envisioned when he devised a model ranking assets based on their risk level and financial soundness. The American economist and central banker placed risk-free gold at the apex of the inverted pyramid, below Federal Reserve cash, U.S. treasury bills, notes and bonds, AAA-rated corporate bonds, paper currencies, certificates of deposit (CDs), bank deposits, commercial paper, state and municipal bonds, junk bonds, segments of the Eurodollar market, Third World debt, insolvent borrowers and thrifts.

A monetary researcher and visionary, Exter understood how gold’s scarcity and trustworthiness made it foundational in an unstable financial world. He knew gold would endure amid expanding debt and an unlimited supply of paper currencies, which he referred to as “IOU Nothings.”

Exter’s original gold-based pyramid is a simple yet timeless way of viewing a top-heavy financial infrastructure, which today is burdened by $1 quadrillion in unregulated derivatives, $270 trillion in snowballing global debt, and trillions more in unfunded liabilities. In an overleveraged and indebted world, gold is the keystone, supporting all other assets that bear greater risk and loss potential.

Consider these examples:

  • Cash deposits and government bonds lose value to inflation in a low-interest or negative-interest rate environment.
  • Corporate and municipal bonds can become worthless when companies fail and cities default due to excessive debt.
  • Stocks can decline during stock market crashes and may become worthless.
  • Even real estate investments can decline in value when financial bubbles pop and property markets collapse.
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Disclaimer: The information contained in this article/video provides a general overview of subjects covered, and the expressed personal views and opinions are not intended to be taken as advice ...

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